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Will Ware (Webmaster)
Member Admin

A post on Facebook from Gary Redden on this....

 

"I am sure you have the tail wheel off the ground, Move the rudder all the way to one side. then move the tail wheel all the way to the stop on that same side. then do the spring and chain for the opposite side. So if you moved rudder and tail-wheel all the way to the left do the chain and spring on the right side to were it is just a bit loose, then do it to the other side. They both can be loose when its strait its when you are full one direction or the other you do not want the other side tight trying to pull the tail wheel back straight. , that is what will start a wheel shimmy. The tension on the chain/spring when wheel and rudder strait does not matter one bit. "

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Posted : 21/03/2020 5:54 pm
David Roth
Trusted Member

@stinsono

Thanks for posting the video & Gary Redden's rigging instructions. That's the best description of how to do it that I've seen.  David

 

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Posted : 22/03/2020 12:15 pm
Dennis Crenshaw
Estimable Member

@dsrothmac-com   Hey David, I watched Gary Reddin's video, too.  He really knows the airplane.  There are some good YouTube videos on rebuilding and rigging the Scott.  Here's one showing how you want to adjust your chain lengths:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtokU8mIDQk&t=154s

After re-reading your earlier posts, I surmised that you have a small tail Stinson.  On the dash 3 like mine, I have 5 chain links on each side.  On the small tail, you're probably going to need only 3 or 4 lengths as you already found out.  One thing Gary mentioned that I found out when going through my tailwheel is the number of compression springs to be used on the heavier airplanes like the Stinson.  I bought my almost new Alaska 3200 tailwheel on eBay when my original Scott needed a major($$$) part replaced.  After talking with the Alaska Bush people, they informed me that my serial # t/w came with 3 compression springs when new.  It had been originally bought for a Champ.  The Stinson requires 5 springs.  The compression springs provide pressure against the friction discs.  I also asked them how much to tighten the spindle nut on the bottom-- they said tighten the nut until you feel some resistance, and then give it 3/4 of a turn, and then loosen or tighten to suit.  With a 100+ pound tail on the back of the Stinson, I saw no reason to have too little resistance back there, so I tightened the nut a bit to give some resistance.

Alaska Bush tw

 Dennis Crenshaw.  N6102M.

 

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Posted : 23/03/2020 7:17 pm
David Roth
Trusted Member

@dcn6102m

Dennis, yes I have the small tail.  The compression springs you speak of are inside the 3200 tailwheel?  I've never had one apart.

As for the rigging I am not sold on the method Gary likes.  I rigged mine according to his directions and got it just about perfect with 4 links. The end result is very loose chains when all is lined up straight ahead with the airplane centerline.  It has made ground handling quite difficult.  The CFI I am flying with, a very experienced tailwheel man, doesn't like it & recommends removing a link from each side.  I'm planning to do it because I don't like it either.

I have no experience with tailwheel airplanes and have been a nose dragger flyer for many years.  I'm learning the airplane & the flying from scratch and I must admit the flying (actually ground handling) is a steep learning curve for me.  I have about 10 hrs. now.  Thanks!

 

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Posted : 23/03/2020 10:22 pm
David Roth
Trusted Member

@dcn6102m

I see from your picture that you have the heavy 3239 springs like I just installed.

 

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Posted : 23/03/2020 10:24 pm
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