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Cabin Width?  

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Dan Bloemer
(@bloemergmail-com)
Active Member

I'm considering the purchase of a Stinson 108-3, but have never had the opportunity to look at one in person closely. Can someone who owns one share with me the interior cabin width, at the hips and at the shoulders, for the front and back seat rows? That is one tidbit of info that I have been unable to locate online, and can be important for comfort for us modern Americans when traveling in aircraft designed for post-WWII body sizes. Thanks!

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Posted : 29/10/2019 12:00 am
Will Ware (Webmaster)
(@stinsono)
Member Admin

Prob not exactly what you were looking for, but its from our Tech Channel on Youtube

https://youtu.be/kT-4a2XQTHk

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Posted : 29/10/2019 4:22 am
Dan Bloemer
(@bloemergmail-com)
Active Member

Thank you! You are correct; not exactly what I was looking for, but very helpful. I had not realized the cabin HEIGHT was such an issue in the back seat - that would be uncomfortable for any lengthy trip for an average height male in the back, while children would probably be fine. I would still like the numbers if anyone had a chance to bring a tape measure to their plane.

Dan

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Posted : 29/10/2019 8:05 am
dcn6102m
(@dcn6102m)
Estimable Member

@bloemergmail-com

Dan, read my comment to the video above.  That guy does not have headliner bows - looks like the overhead is a flat sheet of plywood or some material.  There is more headroom in the typical Stinson with typical wool or vinyl headliner.  

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Posted : 30/10/2019 12:13 am
dcn6102m
(@dcn6102m)
Estimable Member

@bloemergmail-com

Dan, read my comment to the video above.  That guy does not have headliner bows - looks like the overhead is a flat sheet of plywood or some material.  There is more headroom in the typical Stinson with typical wool or vinyl headliner.  

Dennis Crenshaw.  N6102M.

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Posted : 30/10/2019 12:18 am
Dan Bloemer
(@bloemergmail-com)
Active Member

@dcn6102m

Thank you Dennis. I'd also like to know the front seat dimensions. Any chance you could share those with me, as well as the back seat, seat-to-headliner height when the headliner is properly installed?

Dan Bloemer

Amelia Island, Florida

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Posted : 02/11/2019 7:10 pm
dcn6102m
(@dcn6102m)
Estimable Member

@bloemergmail-com

Dan, right now I have the interior out of my airplane, so I can't provide the back seat dimensions.  Next time I get out to my hangar, I'll measure the distance between the door frames which should give you the approximate width at the shoulders in the front seat.  I can comfortably sit in the back seat and lay my head against the head cushion with comfortable headroom.  However, I'm only 5' 8" tall.  In the front seat with a headset on, the top of the headset is just below the headliner.  However, I usually have the seat most of the way forward (short legs).  A taller pilot would have it slid back some, which would increase the headroom.

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by dcn6102m
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Posted : 02/11/2019 10:58 pm
Dan Bloemer
(@bloemergmail-com)
Active Member

@dcn6102m

Thanks for that info. I'm volunteering at an EAA event in a couple of weeks at KSSI, perhaps I'll see one there I could measure.

Dan

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Posted : 03/11/2019 5:31 pm
dcn6102m
(@dcn6102m)
Estimable Member

Dan,  Although the interior is out of my airplane, I measured between the door frames and came up with 36 inches.  Hope this helps.

Dennis Crenshaw.  N6102M.

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Posted : 04/11/2019 9:28 pm
Dan Bloemer
(@bloemergmail-com)
Active Member

@dcn6102m

Thank you Dennis! That is very helpful.

Dan

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Posted : 05/11/2019 4:04 pm
lawheelock
(@lawheelock)
Honorable Member

@bloemergmail-com

Dan,

I used to be 6ft high and used to weigh 235.  My 108 (they all have same interior diminsions) has never been limiting to me for the past 51 years that I have owned my Stinson.  I found that the front seats are at least as wide as the coach seats in most airliners, like Southwest 737s.  The back seat head room is not limiting as long as it has the original type sling rear seats and cushions.  The rear seats that Airtex provide are better than the originals as far as the slings are concerned.  It is not as roomy as a 182, but the rear seat is more comfortable with more legroom than my Mooney M20C.  The Stinson 108 series have always been rated more creature comfortable than many other planes such as Tri-Pacers. 

Larry Wheelock, A&P/IAStinson 108 N584LW 180 LycTexas in Winter; Indiana in Summer

ReplyQuote
Posted : 06/11/2019 6:27 am
Dan Bloemer
(@bloemergmail-com)
Active Member

@lawheelock

Larry,

Thanks for that info. I'm a commercial airline pilot, and although I have not measured them myself, the 737 coach seats are reported as 17" wide (Airbus are 18"). The extra 1" doesn't sound like much, but I can assure you it is noticeable, based on many, many flights commuting on those aircraft. 17" (about 36" if you include 2" of armrest space between) is reasonable for 1940's Americans, but only one at a time could use the armrest. To me, 17" seats plus about 7" more for arms/shoulders (total of 41" at the shoulders) would be the minimum I would consider comfortable for my wife and I to fly longer trips together, with 42" preferred. Of course, one of the great features of the Stinson is that they are inexpensive to buy and to fly, and that is also important to me. In addition, I realize that the wider the fuselage is, the more drag it will have, requiring either slower cruise speeds or more power/gas cost. So, like everything in aviation, there are trade-offs. I'm trying to determine if I will be happy with that much of a trade-off. I think that I will need to find one at a fly-in to actually sit in to see what it feels like.

Dan

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Posted : 06/11/2019 12:39 pm
Charlie Dyer
(@oakchasgmail-com)
New Member
Posted by: @bloemergmail-com

@lawheelock

Larry,

Thanks for that info. I'm a commercial airline pilot, and although I have not measured them myself, the 737 coach seats are reported as 17" wide (Airbus are 18"). The extra 1" doesn't sound like much, but I can assure you it is noticeable, based on many, many flights commuting on those aircraft. 17" (about 36" if you include 2" of armrest space between) is reasonable for 1940's Americans, but only one at a time could use the armrest. To me, 17" seats plus about 7" more for arms/shoulders (total of 41" at the shoulders) would be the minimum I would consider comfortable for my wife and I to fly longer trips together, with 42" preferred. Of course, one of the great features of the Stinson is that they are inexpensive to buy and to fly, and that is also important to me. In addition, I realize that the wider the fuselage is, the more drag it will have, requiring either slower cruise speeds or more power/gas cost. So, like everything in aviation, there are trade-offs. I'm trying to determine if I will be happy with that much of a trade-off. I think that I will need to find one at a fly-in to actually sit in to see what it feels like.

Dan

Dan, hope you found one to sit in... But don't forget, in GA aircraft you can slide one seat forward and the other back (at least in the front), and many folks with even 6 passenger pickup trucks have to do that to accommodate long legged rear passengers.

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Posted : 06/11/2019 5:45 pm
David Roth
(@dsrothmac-com)
Active Member

@bloemergmail-com

Here is an article that gives a lot of information & dimensions.

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Posted : 07/11/2019 4:41 am
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